Saliva for Oral Health

When you think about dental health, it is not likely that you think about saliva as all that important. In fact, however, the saliva in your mouth affects your health and the health of your mouth and teeth significantly. Saliva is absolutely essential for a healthy mouth, gums, and teeth, as well as for your overall system. Your mouth constantly produces small amounts of saliva that enter the mouth through salivary glands inside your cheeks, under your tongue, and near your jawbone. Your salivary glands increase production when you eat or even just think about or smell food. The average person produces 2-4 pints of saliva daily. So what does this saliva do for your system and why is it important for oral health? Saliva and Oral Health Saliva is made up primarily...

Improve your Dental Health

We all know and understand that oral health is important and it takes work on our end to maintain healthy oral hygiene habits. When it comes to implementation, however, sometimes the simple basics are placed to the side due to more immediate and pressing areas of your life, or it can simply feel daunting and you may not know where to begin. The truth is, good oral health is not complicated. You’ve heard all the right things before, but it can help to be reminded of the basics to ensure you are setting yourself up for a lifelong healthy smile. Here you will find some of the most proven tips on maintaining a healthy smile for life: Brush Regularly and Often Brushing is certainly the most basic and expected aspect of a healthy mouth routine. We all know that we...

Holiday Health and Your Kids

The holidays are typically a time of increased sweets consumption, especially for children. How can you help your children make wise choices during this time of year to help protect their teeth and keep a healthy smile all year round? Below are some fun resources from the American Dental Association that can make caring for your teeth a fun experience for your children and can serve as a reminder that oral health is important during every season. The American Dental Association puts out great resources for kids to help them make wise choices regarding their dental health. In partnership with Hermey the Elf from the TV special Rudolph the Red Nosed Reindeer, the ADA has “joined forces to come up with ways to keep your mouth healthy during the...

Receding Gumlines

Gum recession is what happens when the gum tissue surrounding the teeth pulls away from the tooth, exposing more of the tooth and/or its root. In early stages, receding gumlines might be hard to notice. In fact, since it occurs gradually over time, you may not notice it as it typically does not initially present with pain. But as gum recession gets incrementally more severe, a quick glance at your smile may help you see where any recession may be present. Often, a tooth will appear longer when a gum recedes, and the gum area is higher than on other teeth. This recession at the gumline creates pockets, or gaps, between the teeth and the gums where bacteria can build up and damage the tooth. Often, as a gum recedes, a notch can be felt near the gumline of that...

Sports Dental Injury

It’s football season, and with it the reminder that in any contact sport (or speed sport) there is susceptibility to dental injury if you’re not adequately protected. In fact, it is estimated that between 13-39% of all dental injuries occur while playing sports. As well, at least 80% of dental injuries affect at least one of the front teeth. The damage that can occur from sports is something to note and be aware of so that you take the needed precautions to protect you and your family. If you or your loved one is involved in speed or contact sports, there are a few ways to help prevent dental injury: Wear a Mouth Guard Did you know that approximately 200k mouth injuries per year are prevented simply by the use of mouth guards? Wearing a mouth guard is one of...

Handling Dental Emergencies

Although none of us like to experience them, due to accidents and other potential causes, there are times when dental emergencies occur. When they do happen, it is important to know how to respond to ensure the best possible outcome and the greatest likelihood for minimal long-term damage to your teeth. With any emergency, we encourage you to first and foremost remain calm and keep a clear head to assess the situation. Although not all dental emergencies require immediate care and attention, if medical care is warranted, don’t hesitate to call 911 or make your way to the emergency room. Below we outline some of the most common dental emergencies and how to handle them: Cracked or Knocked-Out Tooth If an accident leads to the damage of your teeth, whether a...