Receding Gumlines

Gum recession is what happens when the gum tissue surrounding the teeth pulls away from the tooth, exposing more of the tooth and/or its root. In early stages, receding gumlines might be hard to notice. In fact, since it occurs gradually over time, you may not notice it as it typically does not initially present with pain. But as gum recession gets incrementally more severe, a quick glance at your smile may help you see where any recession may be present. Often, a tooth will appear longer when a gum recedes, and the gum area is higher than on other teeth. This recession at the gumline creates pockets, or gaps, between the teeth and the gums where bacteria can build up and damage the tooth. Often, as a gum recedes, a notch can be felt near the gumline of that...

Handling Dental Emergencies

Although none of us like to experience them, due to accidents and other potential causes, there are times when dental emergencies occur. When they do happen, it is important to know how to respond to ensure the best possible outcome and the greatest likelihood for minimal long-term damage to your teeth. With any emergency, we encourage you to first and foremost remain calm and keep a clear head to assess the situation. Although not all dental emergencies require immediate care and attention, if medical care is warranted, don’t hesitate to call 911 or make your way to the emergency room. Below we outline some of the most common dental emergencies and how to handle them: Cracked or Knocked-Out Tooth If an accident leads to the damage of your teeth, whether a...

Easing Dental Anxiety

Visits to the dentist have the potential to trigger high levels of anxiety for some people. Dental fears and anxieties are particularly common among children. If you or your child struggles with dental fears, it may be good to know there are options available to help ease the stress of your upcoming visit. One of these options is the use of nitrous oxide. Nitrous oxide is a safe and effective method of sedating a patient, which helps them to relax during a dental procedure. Here are some common questions and answers about nitrous oxide to help you better understand its use and determine if it is a good option for you or your loved one at your next dental visit: How does Nitrous Oxide Work? Often known as “laughing gas”, nitrous oxide is a sedative agent...

Wisdom Teeth – Potential Problems

From birth, your mouth encounters many changes – from the breaking through of the first tooth in your first year of life to the loss of baby teeth and the growth of permanent, or adult, teeth throughout childhood. The last teeth to emerge from your gum line are known as wisdom teeth, or third molars. Wisdom teeth do not emerge in one’s mouth until later in adolescence, typically between the ages of 17-21. Due to many factors, wisdom teeth are often recommended for removal either before or after they emerge at the gum line, as they can be accompanied with many potential issues. We want to help you understand more about the potential problems with these late-breaking molars and what you should do about them. Here are the most common causes for removal of wisdom...

Do You Grind Your Teeth?

Teeth grinding or clenching, known as bruxism, is a common issue for many of our dental patients. In fact, approximately eight percent of adults grind their teeth (typically at night while sleeping), and this can cause potentially damaging results. Most adults that grind their teeth at night are completely unaware that it is happening (sleep bruxism). Some adults also unconsciously clench their teeth while awake (awake bruxism). You may be grinding your teeth if you experience any of these signs or symptoms: 1) Morning headaches, particularly in the temples 2) Sore, tired, or tight jaw muscles 3) Unexplained wear on the enamel of your teeth 4) Chipped or loose teeth 5) Pain that feels like an earache, but is not due to a problem with your ear What causes...

Facing Your Dental Fears

It is quite common to face a bit of apprehension before visiting the dentist due to past experiences, fear of pain, fear of the unknown, or simply embarrassment over the state of your teeth. In fact, up to 20% of the population experiences dental anxiety at some level, with up to 8% so fearful that that they avoid the dentist altogether. We want to help ensure that your dental fears do not hinder your long term dental health. Here are a few strategies to help you or others in your family overcome their fear of coming in to visit us and get back in the dental chair! Schedule Morning Appointments Schedule your dental visits for early in the day. This will keep you from dwelling on your pending appointment all day, which may allow for anxiety to build up. Get it...